Q – What if I’m having an issue with my roommate?

A – You can fill out the Members’ Advocate Contact form and contact your Students’ Union.

Q – Where can I get a copy of the Residential Tenancy Act?

A – You can find the Residential Tenancies Act by clicking here, or on the Residential Tenancy Branch Website.

Q – Who is responsible for snow removal?

A – Responsibility for snow removal and other work around the property need to be laid out in an addendum attached to the lease agreement prior to signing. For more information, click here.

Q – Who is responsible for garbage removal?

A – Responsibility for snow removal and other work around the property need to be laid out in an addendum attached to the lease agreement prior to signing. For more information, click here.

Q – Can the landlord enter a tenant’s unit?

A – A landlord can enter a unit upon giving written notice at least 24 hours before entering but not more than 30 days in advance. The notice needs to outline a reasonable purpose for entering, and the time that the landlord will enter the unit, usually between 8 am and 9 pm unless the tenant agrees to another time. For more information, click here.

Q – How can I tell if this person is my tenant or my roommate?

A – If you share your living space with another person who is not included in your tenancy agreement and he or she pays rent to you for a room, you are likely a landlord in this situation. You will have to follow the law as any other landlord does. Contact the Residential Tenancy Branch for more information.

Q – What if we are both on the written tenancy agreement and pay separate rent payments to the landlord. Is this person my roommate?

A – They can be your roommate, or joint-tenant, and also the co-tenant. If you both pay rent separately to the landlord, but you are each paying a portion of the rent, then you will probably be considered ‘joint tenants’. This means you are jointly liable for the full amount of rent and any damages to the rental unit. A Notice to End Tenancy given by one, ends the tenancy agreement for all. If you are both on the written tenancy agreement and it shows individual rent amounts for each tenant, then you may be found to be ‘tenants in common.’ As tenants in common, you have a common responsibility to the landlord, but you are only responsible to the landlord for your stipulated share of the rent and each of you can end your tenancy individually, without ending the tenancy of other tenants in common. Most tenancies are ‘joint tenancies.’

Q – My roommate is on the tenancy agreement with me and I want him to move and he won’t. What can I do?

A – You may want to seek legal advice on how to deal with this kind of dispute as the Residential Tenancy Act does not apply to disputes between roommates. If you can’t get along, it isn’t the landlords’ problem or his or her responsibility to deal with the dispute. It’s up to you and your roommate to work it out.